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In recent years the media has made some progress in showing more people, both men, and women of different shapes and sizes. For example, the model Ashley Graham was the first plus-size model to appear on the cover of Sports Illustrated, as well as that Women’s Running magazine has now featured two plus size women on their covers and more recently Tess Holliday was on the cover of Cosmpolitan.

While this often causes mixed views as some people believe it promotes obesity, the fact that it is even discussed demonstrates why there needs to be more shapes and sizes of all people in the media. If there was then the conversation wouldn’t even have to be had. 

Because of the rise of Instagram, there is now a new crowd of people who are seemingly ‘real people’ on Instagram, influencers, stars, whatever you like to call them who have found fame on Instagram and turned to be themselves on the platform into a fulltime job.

Yet many of the successful models are still representing on a certain body type. While Instagram has opened up space for more people to become models or influencers, the whole culture of taking photos and sharing photos is adding even more pressure to what was once just trying to look like women in magazines. 

Because of this, there needs to be even more diversity in the media, it shouldn’t just be plus-size models either but women of all shapes, sizes, and appearances on the cover of magazines and on TV as it’s not just about size.

For example, you could have a very small, what’s considered ‘skinny’ girl but she could feel very insecure about her muscular arms, or her flat chest, or, she might still even be conscious of her belly.

Just because she’s a size eight doesn’t necessarily mean that she is toned and trim. There is the size of your waist, the length of your legs, your chest, your arms, your face – all these things which make a person unique and yet we only ever see one type when there are so many different variations. 

Not only does the stereotypical image of a model need changing into something more relatable but the bodies of characters on TV and in films need to be more reflective of the general population as well as mannequins in high street clothing shops.

According to a study, male mannequins typically appeared to be a healthy size, but female mannequins often appeared to be representative of an unhealthily thin body.

Thankfully times are changing when it comes to this though as places like https://shop.moremannequins.co.uk/ are now offering all different shapes and sizes of mannequins and according to them there is now more than ever a demand for natural size mannequins, and to make people feel more comfortable about their own bodies they have also created a plus-size line of mannequins.

While it is good that progress is happening, there is still a long way to go, but times are changing, and it’s exciting for everyone.

This is a collaborative post*


Why It's Important To See All Shapes And Sizes In The Media